Featured Articles

While we are still enjoying summer, fall will be here sooner than we wish and as we know in the industry, fall begins trade show season. This year marks the first time in ages that the ASPE Convention and Expo 2018 will not be occurring on or around Halloween. To get a better feel for the convention Read More

While we are still enjoying summer, fall will be here sooner than we wish and as we know in the industry, fall begins trade show season. This year marks the first time in ages that the ASPE Convention and Expo 2018 will not be occurring on or around Halloween. To get a better feel for the convention and expo, we chatted with Billy Smith, Executive Director/CEO of the American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE).

MH: Before we talk about the convention and expo, how is ASPE doing as an organization and what are some of the programs and industry resources you offer to plumbing contractors?

BS: First, I just want to express how exciting it is to be serving the ASPE membership and the plumbing industry as a whole as the Society Executive Director/CEO. Our Society’s Board of Directors and our talented staff are focused on our membership growth and improving the industry as a whole, and ASPE is continuing to advance those objectives with a positive outlook. Having had the opportunity to serve our Society on the Board of Directors for 10 years and then join the Society staff, serving as both the Executive Director/CEO and Sr. Director of Technical and Regulatory Affairs, gives me a different and effective perspective to assist our continued development and growth on a global basis. My goals and desires are to continue implementing the policies and procedures established by the ASPE Board of Directors in support of ASPE’s local Chapters and for all Society activities and programs.

ASPE would be proud to expand on the collaborative opportunities that would benefit contractors and our members alike. Most importantly, we have an entire track this year as part of our Technical Education Program specifically related to construction design, allowing for contractors to have an opportunity to address our members and vice versa. This is important to ASPE as to how we can better assist each other by discussing strategies to successfully work together in areas such as design/build and design/assist projects. Gaining a better understanding of each other’s demands would be a good collaboration. I’m sure there are other areas, and ASPE would be interested in developing additional relationship opportunities.

I feel that my role as an industry professional for well over three decades in different capacities can be an asset that brings perspective to all of our various membership groups and industry partners relating to joint venture opportunities. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to serve our Society by assuming a leadership role as a member of the Board of Directors as the Vice President, Affiliate, representing our manufacturers and representative agencies, which would connect with the contractors as well. ASPE would like to work with the contractor industry to increase educational opportunities. ASPE has a very successful webinar facility that we would gladly make available for joint opportunities.

As well, I will continue to build and maintain relationships with all of our industry partners to ensure that the public’s health and safety are kept at the forefront of legislation and regulations regarding plumbing system design, installation, inspection, and maintenance as we work as a team, particularly to ensure that the public’s health and safety are kept at the forefront of our respective collaborative efforts.

MH: In addition to how you’re doing, what are a few issues facing the plumbing industry and how is ASPE is taking a leadership role to address those issues and challenges?

BS: ASPE will always play an important role in addressing the largest concerns within our industry that are directly connected to our mission statement: “The American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) is the international organization for professionals skilled in the design, specification, and inspection of plumbing systems. ASPE is dedicated to the advancement of the science of plumbing engineering, to the professional growth and advancement of its members, and to the health, welfare, and safety of the public.” Just to name a few, some of the vital areas continue to be water and energy efficiency, Legionella/pathogens risk mitigation, Hunter’s curve improvements from the commercial side, legislation/regulatory/advocacy efforts, lead and copper, industry research, PERC (Plumbing Efficiency Research Coalition), PILC (Plumbing Industry Leadership Coalition), and flush and flow reduction issues, while always keeping our eyes and ears open to new design trends in healthcare and medical gases.

MH: Now, let’s chat about the Convention & Expo…it’s less than 100 days away. Our readers probably don’t realize the amount of time that goes into producing a show if this size, so take us behind the scenes…what has the last year been like putting the show together and address why the dates were moved from the traditional Halloween timeframe?

BS: Actually, planning for our Convention & Expo, which is a biennial event, begins several years in advance with the city/location selection. We research several cities for consideration and present the available options to the Society Board of Directors for the final decision. Once that decision has been made, the preparations begin and never really stop. However, yes, the final year leading up to the actual event is like being in the eye of the storm, if you will. Things are always moving and changing, and we have learned to be extremely flexible to address our members’ needs to ensure that we provide the best member experience possible. This includes all of our member categories as we strive to bring the most benefit to our exhibitors, our industry partners, and in general anyone who takes the time to come join our events; we want them to continue returning for the next and the next. That is our focus: consistent benefit growth to our stakeholders.

MH: The Convention & Expo is in Atlanta this year, what makes Atlanta so attractive to ASPE, attendees and exhibitors?

BS: From an attendance and participation standpoint, Atlanta is an easy city to get to from anywhere really. Being a main hub for one of the world’s largest airlines is helpful. Having the largest portion of our membership base in the eastern portion of the U.S. connects well with Atlanta and the ease of arrival. As well, Atlanta has much to offer for those who may plan to come a litte early or remain afterward for some individual or family time.

MH: Technology and innovation are often overused buzzwords, but in the case with the Convention & Expo, you have several hundred exhibitors showcasing their newest products. Can you give us some information on the number of exhibitors and why it’s so valuable for a plumbing contractor to attend and walk the expo floor?

BS: By attending the free Expo on October 1–2, participants will have the ability to connect with more than 300 exhibiting manufacturers and suppliers and network with more than 4,000 industry professionals from around the world. In addition, they will have access to complimentary education sessions in the Innovation Theater in the ASPE Pavilion as well as our co-located ARCSA Pavilion exhibitors. In addition, we offer continuing education credits for every hour spent on the show floor. Expo-Only attendees just have to pay a minor fee to receive the credits.

MH: Beyond the expo, there are a number of technical sessions, leadership programming and special events, can you provide us with a quick overview of those?

BS: The 2018 ASPE Convention & Expo features 25 technical education sessions for those who pay the full registration fee. The sessions are designed to help plumbing industry professionals at all career levels learn new skills or refresh their design repertoire. Each session offers 0.125 CEUs that can be used for license and certification continuing education requirements. Tracks on System Design; Construction Design; Equipment Exploration; Design, Selection, & Beyond; and Latest Trends are available.

MH: What do you hope attendees will be able to extract from the Convention & Expo?

BS: New relationships, new and fresh ideas, and advanced education and skills play a vital role in moving each attendee forward in their respective career. Regardless of the attendee category, engineer, contractor, rep, architect, or manufacturer, we want to improve the experience for all and give benefit to ensure the next opportunity to participate is a can’t-miss or can’t-afford-not-to-attend moment.

MH: What tidbits can you add that would entice readers who might be undecided about attending this year’s show?

BS: We feel that our Convention & Expo is so valuable to those who attend that the biggest tidbit I would offer to end our discussion would be that those who have not registered to date should consider that they may miss the opportunity to gain important information/education needed to solve the most recent design, construction, application, and implementation issues for their current employer. In most cases, it may cost more to not attend than to attend

MH: Any other items you want to share about ASPE or the Convention & Expo?

BS: Our 2018 Convention & Expo in Atlanta will be one of the best ASPE events ever. Now, to ensure it is the best ever, your attendance is needed. With that, I’m looking forward to seeing everyone in Atlanta. Kick your shoes off and stay awhile.

Combining professional development sessions designed exclusively for plumbing industry professionals with the largest plumbing product trade show in the country, the 2018 ASPE Convention & Expo is the must-attend event of the year. Join thousands of industry professionals in Atlanta, September 28 – October 3, 2018.

 

William “Billy” M. Smith, FASPE, is the Executive Director/CEO of the American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE). Smith is responsible for the administration, management, and financial operations of the Society, as well as implementing the policies and procedures established by the ASPE Board of Directors

Smith has been a part of the plumbing industry since 1981, joined ASPE in 1993 as an Affiliate Member and is currently a Full Member of the Society. He assumed a leadership role in 2002 when he was appointed to the ASPE Board of Directors as Society Affiliate Liaison, and during his tenure the position evolved into Vice President, Affiliate. He was elected to ASPE’s College of Fellows in 2012 and received ASPE’s Distinguished Service Award that same year.

ASPE is the only professional organization devoted to the training and certification of plumbing engineers and designers. ASPE and its 6,000 worldwide members are dedicated to protecting the health, welfare, and safety of the public through the dissemination of technical data and information to expand the base of knowledge among plumbing engineers, designers, contractors, code officials, inspectors, and manufacturers.

A truly unique kind of vodka – one that’s growing quickly in popularity – makes its way through the distilling process flanked by Viega products along the way. At Black Eyed Distilling Co. in Fort Worth, Texas, owners Todd Gregory and Scott Billings make BLK EYE Vodka. It’s as it sounds, a specialty vodka made Read More

A truly unique kind of vodka – one that’s growing quickly in popularity – makes its way through the distilling process flanked by Viega products along the way.

At Black Eyed Distilling Co. in Fort Worth, Texas, owners Todd Gregory and Scott Billings make BLK EYE Vodka. It’s as it sounds, a specialty vodka made with black-eyed peas and corn, sourced completely from Texas. Just a year into the business and the distillery is already winning awards.

Gregory and Billings purchased the distillery from another owner but knew that upon taking over, the building needed to be retrofitted. The basics of the plumbing were in place, but they had to replace a chiller, a boiler and add a blending tank with a cooling jacket. They also needed a new air compressor and air lines.

The duo had plumbing experience, so they planned to do much of the work themselves, which led Gregory to ask a contractor he knew, Randy Pair of O’Grady Plumbing, if he had a pipe threader they could borrow. Pair told him he had a “better deal” and put him in touch with a Viega rep.

“He showed us the fittings and had a loaner set of tools we could use to retrofit. We started using Viega and thought, ‘Oh my gosh, this is incredible!’” Gregory said. “It allowed us to do the retrofitting ourselves as we got the pipe in. We would install and build what we needed to do to fit the particular equipment and it was quick and easy to use the tools.” Gregory and Billings called on Pair now and then to help advise or lend a hand, making sure they were using the right types of fittings for all the different lines they were running, including ProPress for chilled water, steam, water and compressed air lines in the distillery. They also used MegaPressG for natural gas lines.

“I pointed them in the direction of Viega because I knew it would be the best choice for them,” Pair said. “Threading didn’t make any sense for them. Press is a lot cleaner and then they wouldn’t be putting oil in the system. It was just all around a better process for them.”

“If Randy had loaned me that pipe threader, we might still be working on it!” Gregory said laughing. “I don’t even know how to describe Viega. It was amazing for us.”

Read more here

 

To celebrate the 116th anniversary of the invention of modern air conditioning, Carrier is donating dozens of heating and cooling systems to Habitat for Humanity’s annual Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project, including systems that support net zero energy. For the first time, four Habitat homes of St. Joseph County will achieve this distinction, meaning Read More

To celebrate the 116th anniversary of the invention of modern air conditioning, Carrier is donating dozens of heating and cooling systems to Habitat for Humanity’s annual Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project, including systems that support net zero energy. For the first time, four Habitat homes of St. Joseph County will achieve this distinction, meaning they will produce as much renewable energy as they consume over the course of a year.

Installation technicians from Michiana Heating and Air install the first of 23 Carrier home comfort systems in a Habitat for Humanity home as part of the annual Carter Work Project held this year in St Joseph County, Indiana. Carrier donated dozens of residential home comfort systems for the week long long project held at the end of August.

Net zero energy home construction is a bold departure from conventional home building. Constructed to be air-tight, the homes are well-insulated, energy efficient, carbon emission-free, and they result in a net zero energy bill. High efficiency climate controls systems are essential in achieving a net zero home. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the typical American home spends approximately 43 percent of their energy bills on heating and cooling.

“From California to the American South, net zero homes are growing more common, and builders are investing in Carrier high efficiency climate controls systems to drive down energy consumption and improve home comfort,” said Matthew Pine, president, Residential HVAC, UTC Climate, Controls & Security. “We salute Habitat for Humanity of St. Joseph County for resetting the bar for what homeowners can strive for when building affordable homes that are sustainable from day one.”

Two of the net zero homes will be outfitted with Carrier Infinity heat pumps with Greenspeed intelligence, while the other two will receive an Infinity geothermal and ductless system, respectively. The Infinity systems are Carrier’s most efficient and will provide high efficiency climate control that’s essential to a net zero home.

A technician from Four Winds Custom Heating and Cooling prepares to install a Carrier ductless home comfort system at a Habitat for Humanity home in South Bend, Indiana. Four Winds Custom Heating and Cooling is one of three Carrier dealers supporting the Carter Work Project taking place in August in St. Joseph County, Indiana.

Four Winds Custom Heating & Cooling, Michiana Heating & Air Conditioning, and Masters Heating & Cooling, all Carrier factory authorized dealers, will install the systems donated by Carrier.

Carrier also recently donated 23 conventional ducted split systems for an entire neighborhood of new construction homes in Mishawaka, and another 15 ductless systems to support critical home improvements for a blend of military veteran and aging-in-place Habitat homeowners across St. Joseph County.

Carrier has supported Habitat affiliates nationwide with more than $3 million in donations and countless employee volunteer hours since 1996.

Steve Gillispie leads his team in the work to install a Carrier home comfort system in a Habitat for Humanity home in Mishawaka, Indiana. Michiana Heating and Air Conditioning is installing dozens of Carrier systems in every new home built in Mishawaka as part of the Carter Work Project.

“Carrier has been extremely generous with their donation to the Carter Work Project. The total donation will help save us more than 75 percent of our typical heating and cooling cost. Beyond the financial impact, this gift will affect the future homeowners in their everyday lives for many years to come,” said Habitat for Humanity of St. Joseph County President & CEO, Jim Williams.

Since 1984, President and Mrs. Carter have traveled around the world with Habitat to build and improve homes. The time and effort they have contributed help to raise awareness of the critical need for affordable home ownership. Inspiring millions over the last three decades, President and Mrs. Carter have worked alongside more than 101,000 volunteers in 14 countries to build, renovate and repair approximately 4,300 homes.

If you follow the construction industry, you’ll have noticed the current buzz around alternative project delivery. This term refers to integrated project delivery (IPD), design-build (DB) and construction-manager-at-risk (CMAR) approaches, which all differ from the traditional design-bid-build process. These three distinct approaches, which we’ll explore in more detail below, have arisen in response to project Read More

If you follow the construction industry, you’ll have noticed the current buzz around alternative project delivery. This term refers to integrated project delivery (IPD), design-build (DB) and construction-manager-at-risk (CMAR) approaches, which all differ from the traditional design-bid-build process. These three distinct approaches, which we’ll explore in more detail below, have arisen in response to project owners’ desire for a less confrontational and more accountable customer experience.

Types of Alternative Project Delivery

First, it’s important to understand how each of these alternative project delivery methods differ from the design-bid-build approach. Integrated project delivery, sometimes referred to as Lean/IPD, originated out of Lean methodology as a way to involve architects, engineers, contractors and trade partners together in a project as early as possible to build trust and identify issues sooner.

The American Institute of Architects defines IPD as “a project delivery approach that integrates people, systems, business structures and practices into a process that collaboratively harnesses the talents and insights of all participants to optimize project results, increase value to the owner, reduce waste, and maximize efficiency through all phases of design, fabrication, and construction.” As with all Lean construction practices, the objective is to tap into a team’s best thinking, build better relationships, maximize efficiency and minimize waste.

However, it’s important to note that the success of an IPD project hinges on solid relationships and communication between everyone involved. It can also be challenging to work with lenders, contractors or designers who are unfamiliar with this approach.

Design-build (DB) is a system of project delivery in which a project owner, instead of entering contracts with a designer and a contractor, contracts with a single entity providing both design and construction services. According to the Design-Build Institute of America, “the designer and contractor work together from the beginning, as a team, providing unified project recommendations to fit the owner’s schedule and budget. Any changes are addressed by the entire team, leading to collaborative problem-solving and innovation, not excuses or blame-shifting.” Proponents of DB project delivery argue that by uniting the designer and contractor, an owner can avoid the often contentious dynamic that emerges as each party blames the other for delays or other problems.

While DB is advantageous for many projects, it isn’t always the answer. This approach can result in less owner control over the design, and the time and money required for contractors to bid on projects can reduce competition and lead to fewer bids overall.

Construction-manager-at-risk (CMAR) is yet another approach to project delivery in which a construction manager (CM) agrees to deliver a project within a guaranteed maximum price (GMP). A CMAR arrangement may entail project management as well as construction services, depending on the situation. This approach limits an owner’s risk of cost overruns through its commitment to a GMP.

On the flip side, this approach can also reduce an owner’s control over construction due to the shifting of responsibility from the owner to the CM. There is also the potential for a conflict of interest in cases where the CM is also a contractor on the project.

Three Answers, One Problem

These alternative project delivery approaches are being driven by a common industry need—to reduce the confrontation and risk that’s become an industry norm, and to increase accountability and efficiency. In a traditional design-bid-build project, a project owner contracts separately with a designer and a contractor. This can create an antagonistic dynamic between the designer and contractor, as each may try to blame the other when delays or cost overruns occur. The owner often ends up caught in the middle of a dispute that they may not have the ability to adjudicate.

So, it comes as no surprise that many customers are looking for more collaborative project delivery approaches. According to a recent article in Engineering News-Record, revenue for domestic CMAR projects has grown by over eighty-nine percent from 2011 to 2017. Domestic DB revenue grew by over fifty-four percent in the same time frame. While international revenue in both these areas declined, this decline was offset by gains in the domestic market.

Facilitating Collaboration

This push for collaboration reflects the depth of the impact that Lean methodology has had on the construction industry. Industry demand for greater accountability and transparency benefits contractors that have implemented Lean practices such as the Last Planner® System (LPS), particularly those that are using a digital LPS tool.

Because IPD, DB and CMAR project delivery approaches all prioritize collaboration and accountability, it’s crucial to have a reliable and easily deployable tool in which teams can schedule tasks and plan work in tandem. Owners are increasingly unwilling to be dragged into the construction blame game, and expect their project teams to be able to demonstrate their progress and justify their expenses on an ongoing basis.

While this is good news for owners, it spells trouble for contractors that have not yet adopted Lean methodology. Until they do, these firms will be at a competitive disadvantage in bidding processes against firms that can demonstrate a history of collaborative engagements that were completed on or near schedule and within budget. CMAR firms that haven’t implemented LPS are at a particular disadvantage, since they assume a significant portion of a project’s financial risk.

Fortunately, a digital implementation of LPS can be rolled out across an organization quickly, enabling faster and greater return on a company’s investment in Lean practices. As industry demand for alternative project delivery grows, contractors that are prepared to deliver the customer experience that owners are looking for will win more business and build better relationships and reputations.

Katherine Van Adzin is the content marketing manager at Touchplan in Boston, MA. Touchplan is a web-based, accessible-anywhere tool with a way to quantify and qualify areas for continuous improvement. Designed for field planning and management, Touchplan serves everyone on the project team—from subcontractors, superintendents and project managers in the field, to project executives, architects and owners planning the build.

 

No, not that über, Über as “ubah” as in being a superlative example of its kind. On my drive every year to the Milwaukee Tool New Product Symposium I often think about the surprises that await in terms of new tools, technology and trends. This past summer was a bit different in that I believe Read More

No, not that über, Über as “ubah” as in being a superlative example of its kind.

On my drive every year to the Milwaukee Tool New Product Symposium I often think about the surprises that await in terms of new tools, technology and trends. This past summer was a bit different in that I believe Milwaukee built upon its core strengths to make its product offering stronger. Yes, there were some new introductions this year, but the focus remains on the end user, advancing core technologies and game-changing innovation. “We provide solutions which deliver productivity to our users,” says Milwaukee Tool president, Steve Richman.

Steve Richman addresses the crowd.

Being known as a solutions provider, Milwaukee remains steadfastly committed to the trades, “When we say we are focused on the core trades, we mean it,” says Alex Boll, senior product manager, Milwaukee Tool.

For example, expanding upon existing, increasingly popular lines such as the PACKOUT storage system, creating a monster with an even stronger Sawzall and packing more punch with the introduction of M18 Red Lithium High Output HD 12.0 battery have only strengthened the brand.

Battery Tech

It all starts with the battery, and as the competition increases the voltage number in its batteries, Milwaukee is focused on keeping the 18V battery platform, which provides consistency throughout its use—the M18 Red Lithium batteries are compatible with M18 system, which includes 150+ tools.

Paul Fry introduces the M18 Red Lithium High Output HD 12.0 battery.

“Can Milwaukee do more with M18?” asks Paul Fry, vice president of cordless product management. ”The answer is ‘Hell Yes!’” Fry says emphatically. “It’s really about what the technology can do for our customers,” says Fry.

The new M18 High Output 12.0 (nearest) pack a punch.

The next breakthrough in M18 FUEL continues the story of delivering best-in-class power, run-time, and performance. These tools are faster, more powerful, and lighter due to dramatic re-engineering of their most crucial components—motors, electronics and batteries, and they’re still on the same battery system.

Milwaukee introduced its M18 Red Lithium High Output HD 12.0 battery, which, according to Milwaukee, provides 50% more power and runs 50% cooler vs. M18 REDLITHIUM HD battery packs. The increase in power elevates the performance of the entire M18™ system, delivering the power of 15A corded product. It delivers fade free power and runs substantially cooler through heavy applications, is touted as the best performing cold weather pack ever made, providing increased power in extreme cold weather conditions (below 0F / -18C). At the Tool Symposium, we heard that the pack runs at temps as low as -20 F, just sayin’.

PACKOUT with a Punch

The super popular PACKOUT Modular Storage system just keeps getting better. Designed to provide users with the ability to interchange and interlock a wide assortment of heavy duty tool boxes, organizers, and storage totes in multiple different configurations, Milwaukee boasts that the PACKOUT is the most versatile and durable modular storage system in the industry. The new PACKOUT Low-Profile Organizer and Compact Low-Profile Organizer are half the height of the current PACKOUT Organizers with the same impact resistant body. Each Organizer has removable bin dividers and no-travel bin seals to keep products from shifting around. In addition, the organizers are IP65 rated to keep water and jobsite debris out. Oh, and it’s available with optional foam inserts.

The PACKOUT storage system can now be truck-mounted.

And, the new 15” and 20” PACKOUT Tool Bags unzip to reveal large open space for tools, and have cushioned shoulder straps, top handles, and side handles for flexible carry. Each is constructed of tear resistant 1680D ballistic material and have an impact resistant polymer base are up to 5X more durable than other bases, protecting contents from water, abrasion and impact.

Seen at the Symposium, creative uses for the PACKOUT included truck-mounted kits and a movable skid to allow easy mobility. But all of this PACKOUT talk has contractors wanting more. A PACKOUT storage system with drawers for easier access when units are stacked, perhaps? We’ll see.

SUPER SAWZALL

How can you improve upon one the most game-changing tools in the industry? Well, Milwaukee did just that with its new SUPER SAWZALL Reciprocating Saw, which generates 15A corded power, faster Cuts than 15A reciprocating saws, and delivers up to 150 Cuts in 2×12 SPF per charge. Designed to perform in the toughest applications, the M18 FUEL SUPER SAWZALL combines Milwaukee’s legendary performance and durability with the portability of the M18 platform. The POWERSTATE Brushless Motor Provides 3,000 SPM and higher speeds under load for corded cutting performance. REDLINK PLUS intelligence ensures maximum performance and protection from overload, overheating and over discharge.

M18 FUEL 16″ Chainsaw Kit

And from the “Because they can” category, Milwaukee introduced its M18 FUEL 16″ Chainsaw that delivers the power to cut hardwoods, cuts faster than gas, and delivers up to 150 cuts per charge. The unit is designed to meet the performance, durability and ergonomic needs of professional landscape maintenance, power utility, and the installed M18 user.

M18 FUEL 16″ Chainsaw

Drill/Impact Drivers

The M18 FUEL™ ½” Drill/Driver delivers up to 60% more power, up To 1.5” shorter length and up to 2X faster speed under heavy load. The POWERSTATE brushless motor delivers 1,200 in.-lbs. of torque and 2,000 RPMs, providing fast drilling through demanding applications.

The M18 FUEL ¼” Hex Impact Driver features the POWERSTATE brushless motor, which delivers up to 2,000 in.-lbs. of torque and up to 30% faster driving speed, increasing user’s productivity for the most demanding fasteners on the job.

M18 FUEL 8-1/4″ Table Saw w/ One-Key Kit

According to Milwaukee, its new M18 FUEL 8-1/4” Table Saw with One-Key generates the power of a 15A corded saw, 24-1/2” of rip capacity and up to 600 linear Feet of cutting per charge. The table saw is optimized for power, portability and productivity. The POWERSTATE brushless motor provides 6,300 RPM and higher speeds under load for corded cutting performance. REDLINK PLUS intelligence ensures maximum performance and protection from overload, overheating and over discharge.

USB Rechargeable Heated Gloves

From the “pretty frick’n cool” department, Milwaukee expands on its outer wear line with its Heated Gloves. This fall Milwaukee Tool will launch the first heated gloves designed to survive the jobsite and outlast the elements. Powered by rechargeable REDLITHIUM battery technology, the new gloves heat on-demand, providing up to six hours of run-time. To be worn both on and off the jobsite, the gloves are also designed with features to improve overall dexterity and mobility.

“At Milwaukee we understand that trade professionals are expected to work in some very tough conditions, cold weather being one of the most inclement. This is why we’ve been leading the industry in heated jobsite work gear ever since the introduction of our M12 Heated Gear in 2010, and we’re now introducing our first ever heated accessory,” said Kaue Cavalcante, product manager for Milwaukee Tool.

Powered by REDLITHIUM USB, these gloves feature three heat settings—low, medium, high) and fully heat up in just 2.5 minutes. Users will experience up to six hours of continuous run-time, with heat extending to the fingers and back of the hands.

It’s amazing to me to watch the transformation of Milwaukee from what is was, say, more than 10 years ago. As president Steve Richman says, “We are not a lick and stick company,” which basically means that the company does not shop product, not developing solutions. It starts with battery technology, the innovation that goes into producing game-changing tools and the employee dedication to make it the best solutions provider it can be. “We are not overconfident; the day we are satisfied with success is the day we die,” says Richman.